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(DM 362) Sea Gods of Greece and Rome

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Product Description

The Mediterranean Sea basin was important in development of ancient civilizations. The sea faring empires of Greece and Rome integrated the significance of the sea, gods, ships, and rivers into their culture, history and daily life. All are found in the art and coins of Greece and Rome.

This historical collection includes five lead free pewter replicas of Greek and Roman coins related to their maritime heritage.

Itanos Silver Stater. Crete established the first maritime oriented civilization in 2,000 B.C.  Ancient Greek coins of Crete reflect this heritage. For example, Itanos, the city state located on Crete's northeast coast, issued a silver stater showing Triton (merman son of Poseidon, and messenger of sea) facing right striking downward with trident and holding a fish in right hand. The reverse shows two sea monsters facing each other. 320-370 B.C.  (Sear 3318)

Antigonos Doson Silver Tetradrachm. The reverse shows naked Apollo holding a bow seated left at ease on prow of galley. The reverse shows the head of Poseidon, Greek god of the sea, facing right with hair bound with marine plants. This coin cerebrates a Macedonian naval victory over the Ptolemaic fleet off the island of Andros. 229-221 B.C. (Sear 6789)

Brass Sestertius of Emperor Nero.  Improvements to harbor facilities at Ostia, Rome's port at the mouth of the Tiber River, were begun under Claudius and completed by Nero in 63 A.D.  The reverse shows a view of the harbor showing pier, breakwaters, a statue of Neptune, ships with the figure of  the river god Tiber reclining in foreground holding rudder and dolphin. The circular design of the port eventually serves as a model for the construction of St Peter’s at the Vatican. Obverse: Shows a portrait of Nero facing right. This coin was struck at Rome in 64 A.D. (Sear 1953)

Oceanen Brass Medallion.  This extremely rare medallion  to an expedition to Britain undertaken by Constans in the winter of342-343 A.D. to repress the incursions of the Picts, who were desolating the Roman province. This Roman medallion memorializes the importance of Roman sea power in protecting trade and the national security of its possessions. The coin presents a galley with rowers; the emperor in a military dress, with buckler and lance, stands on the deck in the attitude of hurling the lance downwards, as if at a figure swimming in the sea. On the prow of the galley is Victory with garland and palm branch; at the stern are two ensigns. On the shore is a lighthouse. The reverse cast is from the original in the Cabinet de France. The obverse of this medal shows a portrait of Gordian III.

Demetrios Poliorketes Tetradrachm. In 306 B.C. Demetrios of Macedonia met the fleet of Ptolomy I at Salmis, off the coast of Cyprus. In the sea battle, Demetrios completely destroyed the naval power of Egypt; conquered Cyprus; and captured one of Ptolemy's sons.  Demetrios ruled the Macedonian Kingdom from 306-283 B.C. The reverse of this silver tetradrachm shows Poseidon, naked standing left with right foot on rock; he rests his right arm on thigh and holds trident in left hand. The obverse shows the diadem horned head of Demetrios facing right. This Greek coin was  in 289 B.C. at the Amphipolis mint. (Sear 6767)


Manufacturer Description

Greece and Rome integrated the sea, gods, ships, and rivers into culture, and history. Collection consists of 5 lead totally free pewter coin replicas. Crete developed the first maritime civilization in 2,000 B.C. Itanos situated on Crete's northeast coastline, provided a Greek silver stater showing Triton (merman kid of Poseidon, and messenger of sea) dealing with ideal striking downward with spear and holding a fish. The reverse shows 2 sea monsters dealing with. Antigonos tetradrachm reverse shows Apollo holding a bow seated left on prow of galley. Reverse shows the head of Poseidon, Greek god of the sea, dealing with right with hair bound with aquatic plants. Coin cerebrates Macedonian naval victory over the Ptolemaic fleet off the island of Andros. Brass Sestertius of Nero celebratesmprovements to harbor at Ostia, Rome's port at the mouth of the Tiber River. Reverse shows the harbor showing pier, breakwaters, statue of Neptune, ships with the figure of the river god Tiber reclining in foreground holding rudder and dolphin. Oceanen Brass Medallion celebrates an expedition to Britain by Constans in the winter of 342-343 A.D. to quelch the Picts, who desolated the Roman province. This medallion memorializes Roman sea power in trade and the nationwide security. Coin presents galley with rowers; the emperor in a military outfit hurling the lance at a figure swimming in the sea. On the prow is Victory with garland and palm branch; at the stern are 2 ensigns; on the shore is a lighthouse. Reverse cast is from initial in the Cabinet de France. Demetrios Tetradrachm. In 306 B.C. Demetrios satisfied the fleet of Ptolomy I at Salmis, off the coastline of Cyprus. In the sea battle, Demetrios ruined the naval power of Egypt; dominated Cyprus; and captured one of Ptolemy's sons. Demetrios ruled the Macedonian Kingdom from 306-283 B.C. Reverse shows Poseidon, standing entrusted ideal foot on rock; he rests his ideal arm on thigh and holds trident in left hand.

Product Features




  • Greek and Roman Sea Gods

  • Marritime Coins of Greece and Rome

  • Famous Commemorative Ancient Coins

  • Brass and Pewter Coin Replicas

  • Made of lead free pewter in the USA





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