Web Museum Store

(DM 224) Lord is My Refuge - Ein Gedi Framed 11x14

Price: $165.00
Product prices and availability are accurate as of 2017-11-21 04:40:23 MST and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on http://www.amazon.com/ at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.
CERTAIN CONTENT THAT APPEARS ON THIS SITE COMES FROM AMAZON SERVICES LLC. THIS CONTENT IS PROVIDED 'AS IS' AND IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR REMOVAL AT ANY TIME.

Product Description

The oasis at Ein Gedi, on the western shore of the Dead Sea, has continuously supplied fresh water to an arid desert region. In the seventh century B.C. the first permanent settlement of Tel Goren was established at Ein Gedi. In the Old Testament, David sought refuge from King Saul at Ein Gedi  (1 Samuel 24:1).

For more than two thousand years, Ein Gedi has remained a physical and spiritual Jewish refuge from hunger and from the foreign domination of the ancient Persian, Greek, Roman, and the Byzantine Empires. The seven coins displayed reflect a short period where Ein Gedi offered physical sustenance
and spiritual strength during the First and Second Jewish Revolts against the Roman Empire.

Coins Displayed

Judea Capta Sestertius of Rome 71 B.C.
Reverse: shows the inscription JVDEA CAPTA SC in the center of the large copper coin with a palm tree in the center; to the left stands a bound Jewish male captive; to the right of the palm tree is Judea as a mourning female captive seated right. bverse shows emperor Vespasian facing right.
(Sear 2325)

First Revolt bronze prutah of 67 to 68 A.D.
Reverse: vine leaf on small branch with inscription THE FREEDOM OF ZION. Obverse: with amphora with broad rim and two handles inscribed YEAR 2. (Hendin 661)

First Revolt silver Shekel of 66 to 67 A.D.
Reverse: shows stem with pearl base and three pomegranates around inscription JERUSALEM THE HOLY.
Obverse: shows omer cup with smooth rim pearl on either side of the base has pearled ends with inscription SHEKEL OF ISRAEL. Above the cup YEAR I. (Hendin 655)

First Revolt silver Half Shekel of 68 to 69 A.D.
Reverse: shows stem with pearl bottom and three pomegranates around inscription JERUSALEM THE HOLY.
Obverse: shows omer cup with pearled rim. The base is raised by projections on ends with inscription HALF A SHEKEL and YEAR 3 above cup. (Hendin 663)

Bar Kochba silver Denarius (zuz) of 134 to 135 A.D.
Reverse: shows an elongated lyre (kithra)  with three strings: Hebrew inscription FOR THE FREEDOM OF JERUSALEM.
Reverse: shows Hebrew inscription SIMON of five letters in two lines within a wreath of thin branches around eight almonds, medallion at top, tendrils at bottom, and a pair of dots. This coin was struck using dies on existing Roman denarii. (Hendin 723)

Bar Kochba Small  Bronze (20mm} undated struck in 135 to 135 A.D. Reverse: bunch of grapes with branch and small leaf with Hebrew around FOR THE FREEDOM OF JERUSALEM.
Obverse: seven branch palm tree with two bunches of dates; Hebrew across field SIMON.(Hendin 739)

Bar Kochba Silver Shekel (sela) of 134 to 135 A.D.
Obverse: shows the facade of the Temple of Jerusalem with ark and scrolls viewed from end in center, with a wavy line above Hebrew around two sides SIMON.  Reverse: Shows lulav with etrog at left; Hebrew around FOR THE FREEDOM OF JERUSALEM.  (Hendin 713a)

Manufacturer Description

The oasis at Ein Gedi, on the western shore of the Dead Sea, has continuously supplied fresh water to an arid desert region. In the seventh century B.C. the first permanent settlement of Tel Goren was established at Ein Gedi. In the Old Testament, David sought refuge from King Saul at Ein Gedi (1 Samuel 24:1). For more than two thousand years, Ein Gedi has remained a physical and spiritual Jewish refuge from hunger and from the foreign domination of the ancient Persian, Greek, Roman, and the Byzantine Empires. The seven coins displayed reflect a short period where Ein Gedi offered physical sustenance and spiritual strength during the First and Second Jewish Revolts against the Roman Empire. Judea Capta Sestertius of Rome 71 B.C. First Revolt bronze prutah of 67 to 68 A.D. First Revolt silver Shekel of 66 to 67 A.D. First Revolt silver Half Shekel of 68 to 69 A.D. Bar Kochba silver Denarius (zuz) of 134 to 135 A.D. Bar Kochba Small Bronze (20mm} undated struck in 135 to 135 A.D.

Product Features

  • Includes Detailed Descriptions
  • Historical Bible Replica Coin Set
  • Cast in Lead Free Pewter
  • Double Side Coins Marked COPY on Reverse
  • Ein Gedi
View our full range of Dunston Mint products

Write a Review